First night in Athens 

Greece has been a place I have always wanted to experience. When I got the chance this year, I jumped all over the opportunity. 
It started out with 2 days in Athens. The first day doesn’t really count because it was really a blur of jet lag and acclimation. 

We stayed in the Athenian Callirhoe Hotel near the ancient Acropolis. The first evening we ventured to the roof garden restaurant for dinner on top of our hotel. It may be one of those few moments in life where everything seems perfect. It was ridiculously romantic, except that my date (lil’ man) barely made it through dinner and returned to our room. 
I had a drink and watched as the sun set and the lights made the Acropolis glow right outside our terrace. 


The mushroom risotto was near perfect and live jazz played in the background as older couples danced. Exhausted from jet lag and feeling warm and fuzzy from ny cranberry vodka, I returned to my room feeling content. What an amazing first night. 

Advertisements

New York, 3 days, 1 kid

I have been to New York City several times, but it was usually for work or to visit a friend, and I had always avoided the tourist traps. One thing I’ve noticed as I travel with a child is that I tend to gravitate towards a lot more tourist destinations.

Being from Kansas, New York City is a very big awe-inspiring place. I was excited to see it through my sons eyes. It began with fighting the crowds in Time Square to get on a bus tour. I found it completely overwhelming with chaos and people. I found it interesting that my son did too, however Karl thrives off of the energy and loved every second of it. After 2 1/2 hours of touring the downtown loop, we walked through Hells Kitchen and found a small hole in the wall Italian restaurant. After a good dinner and a drink, we were exhausted and retreated back to our hotel for the night.

Day 1

The next morning we set out to explore the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.  I had looked online before traveling to New York to see about getting passes to go into the crown of the Statue of Liberty. It was already booked three months out. I read that pedastool tickets were work first come first serve and could be bought at the ticket office. 

I quickly learned that standing in lines is just part of visiting New York City.  We waited in a long line to buy tickets to the Statue of Liberty and then another line to go through an airport-like security. Then we stood in another line to ride the ferry. The ferry was jam-packed and we couldn’t make it to the top level which was open air. Once we reached Liberty Island, we search aimlessly for the entrance into the Statue of Liberty. What I hadn’t understood it was that there is no entrance. Our tickets were only good for the grounds around the statue and tickets could no longer be purchased to enter inside for the pedastool. I heard many people asking how to enter as well so I knew I wasn’t the only one. It was a bit of a disappointment, because all we could do was walk around Statue of Liberty.

We did go to the information Center where we got the worksheet for the Junior Ranger program. We walked the grounds among the crowds of people answering the questions. My kiddo was sworn in and received his badge as a junior ranger.

We headed to Ellis Island. We were starving, so we decided to grab a bite to eat in the café. It was outrageously crowded so we decided to just grab cold food from the cooler instead of standing in line to order food. We were lucky enough to find a dirty table to sit at.

Ellis Island was very educational and we thoroughly enjoyed the museum. Parker asked lots of questions and I got goosebumps in the giant room where I knew my own ancestors had once stood as immigrants hoping to become American citizens. I got so much more out of this than visiting Lady Liberty.

We returned to the city and hurried to get ready for the theater show Stomp which I had pre-bought tickets for. This was by far the highlight of our trip. There was so much energy and fun in this. I’m not sure if I enjoyed the show more or watching the look and the smile on my son’s face. He was completely enthralled.


We finish the evening with A funky little restaurant in the East Village.  

Day 2

The third day we decided to go see the American Natural History Museum. It was an easy sell to my son, because he seen the movie Night at the Museum. Only after arriving and looking for the Genghis Khan exhibit, were we told that 90% of what is in the movie is fictional. It was a bit of a disappointment, but there was so much to see. We spent several hours wandering through the dinosaur skeletons and the history of the different cultures. You could easily spend more than one day here. Without seeing the entire museum, our feet were aching and it was time to leave. 

We walked around Central Park and pet some of the horses that were attached to carriages. Sweaty, hot, and a bit exhausted we decided to go to Ground Zero. It was tough to explain to my son what the significance of this place holds. I explained about the Twin Towers and how they had been destroyed when terrorists flew planes into them. This led to a deep conversation about evil and why someone would want to do this. 

I was actually very surprised at how emotional this place made me. There are two memorials where the towers had stood. They are fountains that flow into the ground and the names of the victims are displayed in metal along the side. On the name of each victim, a rose is placed on the day of their birthday. Upon seeing the roses, I became a complete and utter emotional mess. I watched a man gently touch a name with a trembling hand and bawl. I could literally feel the tragedy in this place.


We moved from here to Battery Park. We watched some of the street artists, and then took a break under the shade tree enjoying a frozen lemonade. It was a nice reprieve from the heat and walking.

We decided to end our evening with dinner in Hells Kitchen. Instead of researching a restaurant, we decided to just walk along the street and read the menus until we found something we liked. After another amazing dinner and a few drinks, we headed back to our hotel for a restful sleep.

Day 3

Our intention for our last day in New York City was to make the most of it. Honestly, we were just exhausted. We got up early to eat breakfast and then to go play tourist, but we all began dragging our feet. We ended up just taking our time packing our bags and relaxing in the hotel. We decided before lunch to walk down Canal Street where we were told we could get cheap deals on souvenirs. I found it incredibly overwhelming with all the traffic, litter, and people. We walked through Chinatown and the smells physically turned our stomachs and crowds jostled us.

We walked to Katz Deli, one of the oldest delis in New York City. It was crazy busy, and they had to be making a killing at $20 per sandwich. After lunch, we decided it was too hot and we were too tired to do anymore touring. We went to the hotel and picked up our bags and headed for the airport. We hung out in the Admirals Club with free food, drinks, and wifi until it was time to catch our flight to Greece.

3 days is just not enough time in New York City. 

Exploring Cliff Dwellings

Being interested in Native American Indians, I instantly knew my son had to go to Mesa Verde National Park (which is also a World Heritage Site). This is where the remains of hundreds of ancient cliff dwellings that belonged to the Pueblo people are still preserved. Conveniently, its located just 35 miles from where we were staying in Durango, CO.

There are over 5000 archeological sites at Mesa Verde. We were allowed to climb up into the cliff IMG_2008dwellings and see how Native American Indians lived up to 1500 years ago. Being able to crawl down into the ancient kivas where it is believed religious rituals and political meetings were held feels like getting a front seat view of history. If visiting with kids, it’s definitely best with school-aged children that can climb the ladders into the dwellings.

IMG_2010

I would highly recommend taking a ranger guided tour. They are $5 and are worth every single penny. They give great insight into how the Indians lived day to day, along with belief systems, history, and were great at answering questions. I got a real impression that they love their jobs and love this land. Our ranger talked passionately about the importance of preserving such historical places and taking care of the land.

Not only did we visit cliff dwellings, but we also visited Coyote Village. This is a village that has been excavated and stabilized. You can walk along the top exploring the different rooms and structures. It’s like a dream come true for a kid. The ultimate historic playground.

 

Sledding the Great Sand Dunes

Sledding the Great Sand Dunes has been something that has been on my bucket list for quite awhile. I can’t remember where this idea originated, but I knew it was something that was going to happen on this trip.

We woke early and grabbed breakfast on the road. We drove to Alamosa and rented sleds that are set up for sledding on sand at Kristi Mountain Sports. The sales assistant was very helpful and pointed us to a 2 person sled. For $18 we got the sled and a puck of wax for the day.

We headed to Great Sand Dunes National Park. I was ecstatic to be marking this off my bucket list. There were not a lot of people so we didn’t have to worry about crowds. We stopped by the Visitor Center to get our bearings. I read that the we were at 8000 ft elevation (here we go with altitude again). The dunes can be up to 700 feet tall.

It was super windy but the Medona Creek was dry so we didn’t have to wade through it. I IMG_1913put on my small backpack with water and supplies and carried the sled up to the dunes. The wind blew against me leaving me to fight the sled and wind like I was a ship and the sled was the sail.

Climbing the dunes was intense. For every step forward, the sand sunk under my feet and I felt like I went one step back. Fighting sand, wind, and altitude I had to slow my pace. My kiddo scrambled up the dune like it was just another rock. When I finally reached him patiently waiting for me at the time I had to ask him to wait. I couldn’t catch my breath and then promptly threw up. Talk about a full body workout!

Once I caught  my breath we excitedly hopped on the sled. He sat on the front and I sat on the back as I pushed us over the edge. We flew down the sand dune so fast I could barely hold on. It was exhilarating and all I could do was laugh. When we hit the bottom, the sled stuck in the sand and we both flipped. Fortunately I flipped right over the top of him. We landed in sand so it wasn’t a bad landing. We both had faces full of sand despite the sunglasses. We decided to do it again.

IMG_1914Again we hiked to the top. I paced myself a little more this time trying to keep from getting sick again. Once at the top we jumped on and flew back down. This time Parker face planted into the sand and I again flew over him. I was laughing so hard, but he was not so happy. With our feet out to the side trying to steer as we flew down the side of the sand dune, the sand shot up like water and hit him in the face. His eyes were full of sand.

In an effort to help, I dug through my backpack where I keep saline solution. I attempted to block the blowing sand by putting my jacket around him. After flushing his eyes several times we gave up. He could not do another ride. We had sand in every possible crevice and I could feel it crunch in my teeth.

We headed back to the car to get out of the wind and attempt to flush his eyes again. If I had to do it all over again, I would make sure to bring goggles.

His eyes were irritated and red. He was desperately unhappy and I didn’t know what to do. We watched as the wind blasted our car with sand and the view was blocked by a brown cloud of sand. I pulled over again and flushed his eyes. I begged him not to rub them and explained that he had probably scratched them. I tried to distract him with navigating for me. He promptly found Zapata Falls on the map and asked if we could go there. I said definitely and followed his guidance.

Turning off of the highway I had to guide my car slowly through the massive potholes that covered the road. I secretly wondered if I was making a huge mistake and if I was going to get my station wagon stuck. I continued on.

We got to a parking lot and grabbed our small packs. We headed up a trail. As we IMG_1920climbed we stepped over snow and ice. Soon we were walking on the ice all together. We had came upon a woman and two men. My son, not knowing a stranger, engaged them in conversation. We trekked the rest of the way over the frozen stream through the canyons. Just as my son was telling me we needed walking sticks I fell. I fell hard. I got back up and pursued forward.

When we turned around a canyon wall, there stood a giant frozen waterfall. You could hear water flowing behind it. In the ice that we stood on, a hole had formed revealing the IMG_1919freezing water below. One of the men we met decided to take off his shoes and get in. I could only imagine how painful that kind of cold would be on the bare skin.

After playing awhile at the waterfall I decided to head to Durango, Colorado. About a decade before I had stayed at the Strater Hotel. It was by complete serendipity that I found this hotel a decade earlier. Once in the antique decorated rooms in the century old hotel, I read the journal left in each room. Most pages mentioned a hot tub room. When I asked the front desk, they told me it could be reserved in hour increments. Only you had access to it. Remembering this place, I booked a room in hopes that the hot tub would soothe our sore bodies and help wash out the hiding sand that we couldn’t possibly reach.

After an initial shower which covered our shower and bathroom in sand, we went to the hot tub. I found sand in my ears and various other unmentionable places for at least a week afterwards.

We ended the evening at the restaurant connected to the hotel. A country singer with a guitar sang Merle Haggard songs while we ate. Parker was so tired he nearly fell asleep at the table. I paid the bill and we turned in for the night fully exhausted.

Exploring Colorado Springs

We woke early and enjoyed the complimentary breakfast at the hotel. We set off for Garden of the Gods. I had heard a lot about it but had never been. My son started out less than impressed. When we entered the park, it seemed like a giant tease to him. We IMG_1905walked along the rocks and read all the signs that said no climbing. Just before we gave up, the rocks got bigger and there was no rules regarding climbing.

True to his boyhood nature he climbed every rock in the park. He scrambled up crevices, climbed through holes created by thousands of years of erosion, and throughly enjoyed himself. We had a picnic and then decided to head to Pikes Peak.

I bought tickets for the Cog Train to the top of Pikes Peak. We waited patiently among the crowds of people for our train. We sat facing another couple as we headed up the mountain. The views were impressive and at some points snow was high over the window. I found out that the train had just opened that day due to the massive amount of snow. As we ascended the 14,000 feet I felt myself getting light headed. This was a new sensation for me so I didn’t realize I was experience altitude sickness.

IMG_1908.JPGOnce we reached the top I stepped out into the cold mountain air and felt incredibly dizzy. Everything spun and I felt like I might pass out. We went into the gift shop and decided quickly that it was way too crowded. We walked around the top of Pikes Peak taking in the massive view and watching our breaths in the cold air. It was cold enough that when I mentioned returning to the train to wait for our departure my son was in total agreement. I was so dizzy I could barely walk.

On our way back down the mountain I started to feel a little better, but was still a bit off. My son began complaining of feeling sick to his stomach. He laid in my lap for the ride down. When we reached the bottom we both felt ill. Being from Kansas, you don’t get a lot of opportunity to experience altitude like that.

 

IMG_1907It didn’t take long for us to start feeling better. I decided to go out for dinner at a
IMG_1906restaurant that was inside an old Boeing KC-97 tanker, called the Airplane Restaurant.  I knew my son would love it. As anticipated, he was ecstatic.The food was nothing to write home about, but the experience was definitely worth it. Booths were set up where the passenger seating would normally be. I lost him for most of dinner because the cockpit was open for children. There was a bazillion buttons and switches, and definitely sparked his imagination.

With full tummies and tired bodies, I drove to Monte Vista, Colorado while he slept. I checked in after dark and the older man behind the desk talked me like I was a friend. Each room has a theme and we stayed in the Wild Mustang room. I had to laugh when I carried my sleeping son in and laid him on the bed. The decor made it very clear why this room was the Wild Mustang room.

IMG_1904

The next morning when we woke my son sat up, looked around and said, “Well, this is interesting”.

Driving Across Kansas

I find that my son does a lot better if I try to mentally prepare him with what lies ahead. I explained to him that the first day drive across Kansas was going to be pretty boring. I promised him after the first day we would have a lot of fun. Mentally prepared, we loaded up in the car and headed west. Leaving Kansas City, he navigated me on I-70.

I grew up in Kansas and spent a lot of my 20’s exploring it. I dated someone that loved spontaneous adventures as much as I did so we spent days cruising country roads and finding sites. With my goal on Colorado Springs, I decided our first stop would be IMG_1886near Manhattan, KS. One of my favorite places there is called Pillsbury Crossing. It’s a waterfall that many people don’t know about. It’s a few miles southeast of Manhattan on gravel roads and takes a little getting to if you don’t know your way. My favorite part is being able to walk through the water to the falls. We even crawled down and snuck behind the falls.

Our second stop was Rock City in Minneapolis, KS. Again, this is an off the beaten FullSizeRender (5)path kind of site. It’s a random park off of a gravel road 3 1/2 miles south of Minneapolis, KS. As you drive up you see giant boulders in a field. It has the largest collection of sandstone concretions in the world. These giant boulders were rolled when Kansas was covered with an inland sea and left here. To a boy, they are a climbing dream come true. We crawled all over them stretching our legs and playing. He decided this was his favorite stop of the day.

FullSizeRender (4)

Our last stop before our final stop was near Quinter, KS south of I-70. The area is known IMG_1897as the Kansas Badlands. It’s a culmination of chalk, limestone, and shale formations. Castle Rock is literally a giant rock in a field. The Badlands  stand near by and are such a different landscape for Kansas you can’t help but like it. It’s not developed as a tourist site, and I have never experienced anyone else there when I’ve visited.

I decided that this would be the only time I broke my own rule and we would not stop again until we hit Colorado Springs. The pre-downloaded movies and books came in handy.

Around dark my son grabbed a pillow and blanket from the back and promptly fell asleep. I decided that any long driving I had to do from here on out would be done while he was sleeping.

Once we reached Colorado Springs I decided it would be a hotel night. One app I use when on the road is Hotels.com. You can search for hotels in the area and search for the cheapest price along the route. Once you stay 10 nights, you get a night free. Fortunately, I had saved up several free nights for this trip. I pulled into our hotel late and checked in. I had to make 2 trips to the car, first carrying his sleeping body and the second for our luggage.

Killing the Boredom on a Road Trip

Driving across Kansas has to be one of the most brutally boring trips for a child. I made a vow early on that we would not spend more than 2 hours in the car at a time. This would take some serious creativity on my part. I did a little research and decided that 2 apps would be essential in assisting me in keeping my child from ruining our trip out of boredom.

I downloaded the Roadside America app to my phone so we could find odd things along the way to break up the trip. It’s full of great roadside attractions that you wouldn’t necessarily know about.

I also made sure my Geocaching app was up to date on my phone. Geocaching is the equivalent of treasure hunting. It’s a big win with my son. When boredom starts to rear its ugly head I turn the app on and we look for the nearest geocache. We have found them roadside on bridges, fence posts, and trees. It’s a great way to stretch your legs and take a break from the car. It’s also always a little exciting when you find one.

An atlas. Within the first hour of driving I showed my son how to read the atlas. It laid FullSizeRender (7)out huge on his little lap and I explained how it worked. I pointed at our destination and told him he was the navigator. This kept him engaged and let him feel like he had some say in what was going on (not to mention teaching him how to read a map).

Books. At 7 my son was just starting to get good at reading. I found books at the library that were about Native American Indians, the Southwest US, and some just for fun. I would ask him to read to me.

Music. Without intention, we ended up with two theme songs for our trip. They became our favorites and he loved working the ipod and playing DJ. It made for great sing alongs, and he brought his drum sticks so he could tap out the beat.

Ipad. I downloaded kid appropriate movies ahead of time for the hours that were destined for inactivity. (After Kansas he never picked up).

I absolutely love my son, but he has taught me a valuable lesson: when boredom strikes and he’s unhappy, everyone is unhappy. Most of the time he is perfectly happy engaging me in conversation or reading to me. My goal for the trip was not to turn the car around in a few days and call it quits. I knew it was a real possibility if he hated the extensive car ride ahead of us. I personally have little tolerance for whining so this trip could go very good or very bad.

Packing for a Road Trip with a Kid

Knowing my intent, I began to prepare for our trip. I could easily live out of a backpack (and have) so for the first time I had to plan a 2 week trip with a child in tow. I figured I would forget some things, but I needed some essentials. I am a bit of a minimalist, so I pack just what I think we will need. road-trip-sign.jpg

  • Although I’m not a proponent of electronic babysitters, the first 8 hours of our trip was going to be driving across Kansas. I decided that I would need some entertainment for my son. I downloaded some movies to my Ipad and packed several children’s books about Indians and the places we were going. I would ask him to read to me along the way.
  • In order to save money on food, I packed a small cooler and a bag full of snacks.
  • I packed pillow and blankets. I’m only 5’1″ and with my son being 7 we can sleep comfortably in my station wagon with the seats folded down. No need for a tent.
  • I brought us each a small backpack that had a water bag in it. I also stuffed things like snacks, sunscreen, bug spray, etc. in these.
  • I was sure to pack the atlas.
  • Hiking boots
  • Clothes to layer. I wanted to plan for any situation, so we had lightweight hiking clothes along with jackets to throw on in case we got chilly.
  • A roadside emergency kit and a small hiking emergency kit
  • Backup phone charger (you don’t want to lose service on a trail)
  • A trash bag (for wet or dirty clothes), we would be living in the car for 2 weeks after all.
  • A towel for about a hundred different uses.

 

Back to Quito

We arrived back in Quito late. We decided to meet up with friends we had met along the 17264850_10210179870666798_6261762905422355019_nway for dinner. At the advice of a tour guide, we went to his favorite bar and pizza place.

It was a crazy cab ride to get there through small streets and insane drivers. We were dropped off in front of our restaurant. I instantly liked the place. It had a bar feel with tables scattered throughout for diners. We made our way to a back room and sat at a long table and benches. We ordered beer and pizza and enjoyed the rest of the night chatting and saying goodbye to all of our new acquired friends.

17264335_10210179870626797_8063590282878956506_n

 

 

We tried not to make it a late night because we wanted to see tour a little more of Quito the next morning before we caught our plane back to the U.S.

We found several others from our tour at breakfast and we all agreed to tour together. Most of us wanted to go to the same places. We decided to first go ride the gondola lift up the Pichincha Volcano. We piled into a cab and set out. We paid $8.50 each for a ticket to ride the Quito Teleferi17361636_10154151629046920_1389858891764917752_n.jpgco.
We had been warned that it was too cloudy to see anything, but we decided to try for it anyway. It is one of the highest aerial lifts in the world, rising from 10,226 ft to 12,943 ft in 20 minutes. I was happy that we had a clear view of the city all the way up.

Once we disembarked, there was a large indoor shopping area. I instantly ordered a coffee. We were told that caffeine would help with the altitude sickness. Just a few minutes of walking around made me instantly aware of the altitude. My lungs felt like they were being squeezed and I felt dizzy.

17352169_10210372570363732_8474380398732351279_nWe decided to endulge in one of the tourist 17308794_10210390942223017_421669170831413609_n.jpgpictures and made a fun picture for a memory. Continuing the climb up the mountain was not even a consideration. The clouds moved in and I was having trouble catching my breath.

We headed back down the mountain on the gondola. We were happy to find that our taxi driver had patiently waited and we asked him to take us to what the locals refer to as “cupcake hill”.

El Panecillo is a 656 foot hill above the city. Again, the views are spectacular. On top of the hill sets a statue of the Madonna. We went inside and up to the observation deck.

There was a small brick road that lead up the hill to the statue. On the side of the road were local vendors selling souveniers. I negotiated for a alpaca scarf and a few trinkets to take home as gifts.

(I have no pictures of El Panecillo or the spectacular view because my phone was stolen. More about that in my next post).

 

400 year old hacienda

Our bus bumped along a small avenue lined with giant century-old eucalyptus trees. Driving
around the fountain in the middle of the driveway, we arrived in front of Hacienda La Cienega. This hacienda is one of the most historical in Ecuador at over 400 years old. It sits at the slopes of the Cotopaxi volcano. Today, it serves as a boutique hotel and restaurant, though its history has been preserved. 


Lunch was a variety of native food. The best part of lunch was when a local band came through and we were serenaded. There was even one Spanish song that I was familiar with and was able to sing along to. 

17342948_10210179874986906_7229302235458948416_nOnce our lunch and singing was over, the band displayed some small musical instruments and CD’s for sale. My son gravitates towards anything musical (or possibly to anything that makes noise) and picked out a flute. A member from the band came and gave him a quick lesson on howFullSizeRender (16) to blow into it in order to make sound.

After lunch we wandered the grounds, viewing the original church and gardens. I had a coffee and enjoyed the shade of the ancient trees.