First night in Athens 

Greece has been a place I have always wanted to experience. When I got the chance this year, I jumped all over the opportunity.

It started out with 2 days in Athens. The first day doesn’t really count because it was img_2914really a blur of jet lag and acclimation.

We stayed in the Athenian Callirhoe Hotel near the ancient Acropolis. The first evening we ventured to the roof garden restaurant for dinner on top of our hotel. It may be one of those few moments in life where everything seems perfect. It was ridiculously romantic, except that my date (lil’ man) barely made it through dinner and returned to our room.
I had a drink and watched as the sun set and the lights made the Acropolis glow right outside our terrace.

The mushroom risotto was near perfect and live jazz played in the background as older couples danced. Exhausted from jet lag and feeling warm and fuzzy from ny cranberry vodka, I returned to my room feeling content. What an amazing first night.

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New York, 3 days, 1 kid

I have been to New York City several times, but it was usually for work or to visit a friend, and I had always avoided the tourist traps. One thing I’ve noticed as I travel with a child is that I tend to gravitate towards a lot more tourist destinations.

Being from Kansas, New York City is a very big awe-inspiring place. I was excited to see it through my sons eyes. It began with fighting the crowds in Time Square to get on a bus tour. I found it completely overwhelming with chaos and people. I found it interesting that my son did too, however Karl thrives off of the energy and loved every second of it. After 2 1/2 hours of touring the downtown loop, we walked through Hells Kitchen and found a small hole in the wall Italian restaurant. After a good dinner and a drink, we were exhausted and retreated back to our hotel for the night.

Day 1

The next morning we set out to explore the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.  I had looked online before traveling to New York to see about getting passes to go into the crown of the Statue of Liberty. It was already booked three months out. I read that pedastool tickets were work first come first serve and could be bought at the ticket office. 

I quickly learned that standing in lines is just part of visiting New York City.  We waited in a long line to buy tickets to the Statue of Liberty and then another line to go through an airport-like security. Then we stood in another line to ride the ferry. The ferry was jam-packed and we couldn’t make it to the top level which was open air. Once we reached Liberty Island, we search aimlessly for the entrance into the Statue of Liberty. What I hadn’t understood it was that there is no entrance. Our tickets were only good for the grounds around the statue and tickets could no longer be purchased to enter inside for the pedastool. I heard many people asking how to enter as well so I knew I wasn’t the only one. It was a bit of a disappointment, because all we could do was walk around Statue of Liberty.

We did go to the information Center where we got the worksheet for the Junior Ranger program. We walked the grounds among the crowds of people answering the questions. My kiddo was sworn in and received his badge as a junior ranger.

We headed to Ellis Island. We were starving, so we decided to grab a bite to eat in the café. It was outrageously crowded so we decided to just grab cold food from the cooler instead of standing in line to order food. We were lucky enough to find a dirty table to sit at.

Ellis Island was very educational and we thoroughly enjoyed the museum. Parker asked lots of questions and I got goosebumps in the giant room where I knew my own ancestors had once stood as immigrants hoping to become American citizens. I got so much more out of this than visiting Lady Liberty.

We returned to the city and hurried to get ready for the theater show Stomp which I had pre-bought tickets for. This was by far the highlight of our trip. There was so much energy and fun in this. I’m not sure if I enjoyed the show more or watching the look and the smile on my son’s face. He was completely enthralled.


We finish the evening with A funky little restaurant in the East Village.  

Day 2

The third day we decided to go see the American Natural History Museum. It was an easy sell to my son, because he seen the movie Night at the Museum. Only after arriving and looking for the Genghis Khan exhibit, were we told that 90% of what is in the movie is fictional. It was a bit of a disappointment, but there was so much to see. We spent several hours wandering through the dinosaur skeletons and the history of the different cultures. You could easily spend more than one day here. Without seeing the entire museum, our feet were aching and it was time to leave. 

We walked around Central Park and pet some of the horses that were attached to carriages. Sweaty, hot, and a bit exhausted we decided to go to Ground Zero. It was tough to explain to my son what the significance of this place holds. I explained about the Twin Towers and how they had been destroyed when terrorists flew planes into them. This led to a deep conversation about evil and why someone would want to do this. 

I was actually very surprised at how emotional this place made me. There are two memorials where the towers had stood. They are fountains that flow into the ground and the names of the victims are displayed in metal along the side. On the name of each victim, a rose is placed on the day of their birthday. Upon seeing the roses, I became a complete and utter emotional mess. I watched a man gently touch a name with a trembling hand and bawl. I could literally feel the tragedy in this place.


We moved from here to Battery Park. We watched some of the street artists, and then took a break under the shade tree enjoying a frozen lemonade. It was a nice reprieve from the heat and walking.

We decided to end our evening with dinner in Hells Kitchen. Instead of researching a restaurant, we decided to just walk along the street and read the menus until we found something we liked. After another amazing dinner and a few drinks, we headed back to our hotel for a restful sleep.

Day 3

Our intention for our last day in New York City was to make the most of it. Honestly, we were just exhausted. We got up early to eat breakfast and then to go play tourist, but we all began dragging our feet. We ended up just taking our time packing our bags and relaxing in the hotel. We decided before lunch to walk down Canal Street where we were told we could get cheap deals on souvenirs. I found it incredibly overwhelming with all the traffic, litter, and people. We walked through Chinatown and the smells physically turned our stomachs and crowds jostled us.

We walked to Katz Deli, one of the oldest delis in New York City. It was crazy busy, and they had to be making a killing at $20 per sandwich. After lunch, we decided it was too hot and we were too tired to do anymore touring. We went to the hotel and picked up our bags and headed for the airport. We hung out in the Admirals Club with free food, drinks, and wifi until it was time to catch our flight to Greece.

3 days is just not enough time in New York City. 

Volcanos and Moonshine

We headed to Banos, Ecuador from Devil’s Cauldron (about 40 km away). It’s near the active Tungurahua and a gateway to the nearby Amazon Basin. On the way there we 17352380_10210366736337885_4052340927093209023_ndrove by a village that was covered by an eruption about a year and a half ago. We saw the scarred remains of a home.

Once in Banos, we had lunch at a small bed and breakfast and spent the next few hours walking around the city. There were lots of tourist shops offering tours to the Amazon and volcano.

Banos has a very artistic flair, with artisans working in doorways and windows and paintings on buildings. It 17264284_10210172410480298_6561258471637593502_nhas a large ex-pat population, and I can see why. If I return to Ecuador, I would want to come back here.

We wandered into a a vegetable ivory shop called, El Cade. The son is the artisan, carving vegetable ivory, and the mother sat in the corner stringing jewelry he created. He gave a demonstration of how he carved a dried tagua nut into a small pitcher. The tagua nut is actually a seed from a certain palm 17353085_10210366801099504_4831787035353403146_ntree. The vegetable ivory resembles elephant ivory and was actually used for buttons before
plastic was popular. The small sculptures and jewelry were inexpensive and made for great souvenirs.

We took our bag of gifts and headed for the market. Outside vendors hacked away at sugar cane with machetes. One vendor was selling sugarcane ginger moonshine along with every other possible thing made of sugarcane. I took a shot of the moonshine and it was exactly as I had expected, enough to take my breath.

A little buzz from my shot of moonshine, I ventured behind the market and found an amazing view of the city.

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We drove away from the city and towards our lodge for the night. We drove into the Valley of Patate and then just above it to Hacienda Manteles. This place was like something out of fairytale. It was chilly and the air was crisp. The slightly smoking volcano loomed not far in the distance.

When I was shown to my room, a sheep and llama were hanging out nearby. It just added to the magic of the place. The rooms were situated so that 3 rooms were
inside one building with a little living room that had a fireplace. I took a shower and then ventured out to take pictures of the grounds. Lil’ man was playing with the random animals and running everywhere.

As it began to get dark I grabbed an alpaca blanket from my room and big bottle of beer. I had Karl meet me on the porch swing set up overlooking the volcano and valley below. Soon we could see every star in the sky. It was very romantic and peaceful.

Of course it didn’t last long and we ventured up for dinner. We served family style in the main dining room and after we sat around with everyone having drinking by the fire and chatting. Eventually our guide broke out a guitar and we all sang along. It was one of those moments that can make an entire trip. Lil’ man fell asleep on the couch and several of us sat near the fire singing Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”. It was a perfect way to end our night.

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So this is middle aged

Today I turned 40. That’s like middle aged. I would say I should be ready for my mid-life crisis, but I think those are reserved for people who have lived a life of some convention. My whole life has been a mid-life crisis.

I began to lose friends and loved ones as early as grade school. It hit me in second grade when a class mate stood up suddenly and collapsed to his death bed that we are on borrowed time. By the time I graduated high school. I had lost 10 friends or close relatives. Mix that with growing up in a small farm town in Kansas and watching my father beat my mother to near death many times, and I knew I had to move. I couldn’t spin my wheels. Hell, I’d be lucky to make it to the ripe old age of 30. I had a bucket list to get busy with (yes, even in my early 20’s).

Before I hit 20 I had tried college in New Mexico and had worked as a dishwasher, waitress, bookstore clerk, housekeeper, and missionary. I sold my car and bought a ticket to Hawaii because it was somewhere I was always curious about. I sold art on the beach and wondered why I was so completely alone in the world. I came to the conclusion that I was capable of whatever I wanted.

In my 20’s I chased a man back to Kansas, then one to Iowa. I worked in marketing and sales, fire safety in a nuclear power plant, counselor to people with multiple sclerosis, barista, Executive Director of a non-profit, office manager of an environmental firm, personal assistant to a CEO, house sitter, and a nanny.

I fought to be paid and promoted as an equal in a corporate job, had my heart broken at least 3 times, played house, was misdiagnosed with cancer, began painting, and decided I had worth.

I won my first artist fellowship, moved to Europe with $300 and no back up plan, fell in love with myself, and fell in love with so many strangers that became friends.

In my 30’s I became a mother (unexpectedly). All the demons I tried to bury in my 20s came back to play. I was humbled and hungry. I was forced to think about someone other than myself. I wrestled with the fear of never being good enough.

I came to the conclusion that no one had walked in my shoes, therefore their way didn’t work for me. I would have to figure out how to do it my way.

IMG_0004I learned to ask for help, lost friends that were just there for the party, but gained friends who were genuine and true.

I held hands of dying loved ones, held new born babies of friends, learned that crying isn’t weak, and kept another human being alive longer than any house plant in my possession.

And now here I am at the doorstep  of my 40s. My intent is to make the next 40 years as interesting as the first. To remember that I am on borrowed time. I have a gift of another day that at least 40 people in my life no longer have. There is adventure in every day; we just have to be willing to say yes to it. So my physical years on this big blue and green planet might be 40, but I still don’t feel like the grown ups I remember from my teen years. They seemed so polished and put together. I am just me, and I’m ok with that. I’m faking it until I make it. I’m looking for the every day magic, and I’m wearing skirts and tennis shoes.

I’m working on accepting my body, hugging the shit out of the pain and releasing it, loving the unloveable parts, and trying to figure out why in the hell I still get neck acne.

On to the next adventure.